Be sure to follow 9to5Toys to keep up with the best gear and deals on the web: TwitterRSS FeedFacebookGoogle+ and Safari push notifications.

Today’s can’t miss deals:

jlabs-discount-sale

Amazon Gold Box: up to 83% off JLab In-Ear wired/wireless headphones, starting at $10 Prime shipped

iphone-6-cases-at-daily-steals1

iPhone 6/6 Plus cases in multiple colors/styles from $7 shipped (Reg. $17)

macbook-air-2010-MC505LL-A2010 Apple Macbook Air 11.6-inch 1.4GHz/2GB/64GB (refurbished) $500 shipped

trilogy-dock-think-by-m

Trilogy Dock positions your iPhone 6 vertically or horizontally and boosts its sound

iPad Air 2

Apple iPad Air 2 16GB WiFi (Gold, Silver, Space Gray) $460 shipped (Reg. $499)

retina-imac-review

Apple 27-inch iMac w/ Retina 5K display 3.5GHz/8GB/1TB $2,349 shipped (Reg. $2,499)

shelf_2a1

Small States: Former Nike designer brings together form and function with the Spool Dock, multiple giveaways

Other new deals:

buffalo-ac-airstation-travel-router

More deals still:

pac-man-friends-sale-app-of-the-week-free

Black Friday 2014:

walmart-holiday-sale-black-friday

New products/ongoing promos:

spigen-iphone-6-plus-air-skin-case-colors


Filed under: Tips and Tricks Tagged: 9to5Toys, Amazon Gold Box, app deals, Black Friday, Black Friday 2014, coupon codes, Daily Deals, Deals, free apps, JLab, price drops

For more news on Tips and Tricks, 9to5Toys, and Daily Deals continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "9to5Toys Last Call: JLab headphones up to 83% off, iPhone 6/Plus cases from $7, MacBook Air 11″ (refurb) $500, more" with our community.

Amazon's employee demographics numbers are more diverse than most of their tech counterparts. But those stats may be misleading.

Late to the party, Amazon finally publishes its diversity numbers originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2014.

Continue reading…

Copresence-01 Copresence-02

In June a report detailed a feature in development by Google that would reportedly allow Android devices to alert “people, places, and things” to the presence of nearby users. At the time, reports referred to the feature as “Nearby” and described it as a location-based feature for Android devices in close proximity to one another. Today, AndroidPolice is back with more info pointing to evidence that the feature will be cross-platform and allow Android and iOS devices to share content and communicate when nearby.

To authenticate with one another, the two devices would apparently be able to use location information or Bluetooth, perhaps along with a functionality similar to “whisper,” the ultrasonic authentication method Google has used for the Chromecast to allow devices to connect from different networks. Actual information would be transferred using Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi direct… Android and iOS devices communicate with one another in a variety of ways, exchanging files, photos, directions, messages, or other content…

The report says the feature is being referred to as Copresence internally and shared the images (above and below) that were discovered by a tipster in the latest Google Play Services APK. The images depict both iOS and Android devices sharing files, photos, audio, and text between one another using what is reportedly the under development Copresence feature.

Copresence-03 Copresence-04 Copresence-05 Copresence-01 Copresence-02

More evidence, as the report points out, comes from recent developer documentation for a Copresence Chrome API, patents, and internal issue reports for the API that reference the service. AndroidPolice claims the service could arrive in “the coming weeks.”


Filed under: iOS

Continue reading more about iOS at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Google’s upcoming Copresence feature lets iOS & Android users share via AirDrop-like functionality" with our community.

Posted in ios.

Larry Page

In an interview with the Financial Times, Google co-founder and CEO Larry Page talked about an ongoing debate that he had with Apple’s Steve Jobs: whether they’re companies were doing too much or too little to affect the lives of their customers.

Page, as is evident in Google’s seemingly unending push into new markets and technologies outside of search and even the web, came down on the side of doing as many things as possible to make an impact in peoples’ lives, while Jobs was insistent that a focused approach on a single set of problems was better for the company and its users.

Page even went so far as to say that “it seems like a crime” to sit on the resources of a company like Apple or Google and not “do something new.”

Another obstacle lies closer to home. In reaching for the tech industry’s ultimate prizes, Google may already be knocking up against the limits of what it is possible for one company to do. Page relates a frequent debate that he says he had with Steve Jobs, the boss of Apple, who died three years ago: “He would always tell me, You’re doing too much stuff. I’d be like, You’re not doing enough stuff.”

The argument he made to Jobs: “It’s unsatisfying to have all these people, and we have all these billions we should be investing to make people’s lives better. If we just do the same things we did before and don’t do something new, it seems like a crime to me.”

But the idealism does not blind him to the problem of his own ambition. “What Steve said is right – you, Larry, can only manage so many things.” If he – and Google – are to win, they will have to beat the odds that have held big companies back in the past, particularly in the tech industry, where few leaders from one generation of technology have made it big in the next.

It appears that Apple’s new leadership has started to take the “do more” approach in recent years, as the company prepares to branch out into the health, fitness, fashion, and wearable industries in 2015. It may not be as big a jump as, say, manufacturing robotics, but it’s clear that Page’s guidance at Google has influenced how Apple sees its role as a tech company.


Filed under: Tech Industry Tagged: Apple, Google, Larry Page, Steve Jobs

For more information about Apple, Tech Industry, and Google continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Larry Page talks about his age-old fight with Steve Jobs over ‘doing too much stuff’" with our community.

verizon-4g-lte

Verizon is increasing data for customers on $80 and $100 More Everything plans, the company announced today following a similar announcement from AT&T. The carrier is now offering 10GB for $80 and 15GB for $100 up from the 6GB and 10GB those tiers previously offered. Verizon notes that the deal isn’t restricted to new customers, but it is a limited time offer available through its website.

The move from Verizon seems to be in response to a similar announcement from AT&T earlier today that the carrier will increase monthly data allotments for its $40 and $70 data plans starting early next month. AT&T’s increase sees a new 3GB of data for $40 per month plan (up from 2GB) and 6GB of date for $70 a month (up from 4GB). The offers for increased data from both carriers, however, are for a limited time. 

Verizon also announced today that it’s now offering $150 port-in credits for new customers that switch to Verizon and purchase an LTE smartphone on-contract or through its Edge upgrade program.

The increased Verizon data tiers kick in Nov. 1.


Filed under: iOS Devices

For more information about iOS Devices continue reading at 9to5Mac.

What do you think? Discuss "Verizon follows AT&T w/ increased data for $80 & $100 More Everything plans" with our community.

Evernote has begun rolling out updates to its note-taking app to enable a conversation tool: Work Chat. The feature was first introduced at a conference in October, and basically does what you’d guess – it lets you chat about the documents you’re working on. It also lets you share notes to any partners, including anyone you’re connected to on LinkedIn.  You can share notes through the app itself, or send one via email and it will be marked as shared in your conversation for record-keeping. The feature should help make working on documents with a partner more seamless, particularly on mobile devices where switching...

This story continues at The Next Web