Windows licensing is more or less straightforward in the consumer sphere. Oh, sure, there are complications surrounding self-built systems, but compared to the world of enterprise licensing, the range of options is limited and the pricing simple. Corporate licensing, however, is a whole other matter.

We've been saying for some time that the process of updating and upgrading Windows is going to change in Windows 10, and perhaps unsurprisingly, this is going to have implications for Windows licensing.

The underlying theme is this: Microsoft does not want the Windows market to be split between a bunch of different versions. For a brief period, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1 were all both extant and actively supported Windows versions. This is bad for more or less the entire Windows world. It's bad for developers of Windows software because they're forced to choose between the best functionality (found in Windows 8.1) or the widest compatibility (target Windows XP). It's bad for Microsoft, because it has to support all these versions. It's bad, in many ways, for end-users, too; using old versions means that they don't get the latest features, and in the case of Windows XP, they don't even receive security updates.

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The relaunched version of Newsweek is no stranger to controversy. Almost a year ago, it brought the ire of the internet upon it with its launch story on Bitcoin creator Satashi Nakamoto, to the point where the company had to hire private security for the reporter […]

Newsweek designer defends his controversial tech sexism cover originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Sarah Maloy is Shutterstock’s content marketing manager. She’s also an entertainment writer, social media nerd and chronic binge-watcher. This post was originally published on the Shutterstock blog and has been reprinted with permission.   With more than 47 million images in the Shutterstock collection, we’re able to predict the creative industry’s top trends by looking at what our customers are searching for. And with this year’s annual global-trends infographic, we take things a step further — presenting our data for the first time as an exclusive interactive report exploring creative trends in images, video and music around the world. Scroll through the…

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These days, you can learn just about anything from YouTube videos — from how to tie a knot to the best way to open a wine bottle with a shoe. And it isn’t just humans who are benefitting. University of Maryland researchers have programmed a robot […]

Move over Emeril: Robot learns how to prep food from YouTube originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Are you putting together a startup based on a weird idea you had while drinking with friends? Well if you are, you should check out Google Venture’s site about a five-day process for answering “critical business questions through design, prototyping, and testing ideas with customers.” Called the Design Sprint, the site and upcoming book are meant to help new companies really focus on what it is they’re building. The process was used by startups like Next, Blue Bottle Coffee and Foundation Medicine so you know it works. Well at least it worked for those companies. Regardless, it looks like a…

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A group of researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have discovered a way for data structures to work more efficiently with mutlicore chips, according to an MIT announcement on Friday. The scientists will present their findings in February during the Association for Computing […]

MIT has an easier way for multicore chips to use data structures originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Considering the scandalous lack of women entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley, and the debased treatment some receive in the industry, it can be hard to remember that women helped form the backbone of computing when it mattered most. ‘The Queen of Code,’ a brand new 16-minute film from actress Gillian Jacobs, serves up a humorous and inspiring reminder that there is indeed a Mother of Computing. Her name was Grace Hopper: mathematics professor, US Navy Admiral, instrumental in creating the first compiler and the COBOL programming language, popularizing the terms “bug” and “debugging” and much more in her long career. Starting in World War II, the US…

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DeveloperWeek 2015 is San Francisco’s largest one-week tech event series with over 60 week-long events. One of the major events taking place in DeveloperWeek 2015 is the Accelerate Hackathon. This year HP Helion’s team is hosting the Accelerate 2015- Hackathon happening on the 7-8th February 2015. […]

Hackers/coders wanted! Register for the Accelerate Hackathon hosted by HP Helion at DeveloperWeek 2015 originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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DeveloperWeek 2015 is San Francisco’s largest one-week tech event series with over 60 week-long events. One of the major events taking place in DeveloperWeek 2015 is the Accelerate Hackathon. This year HP Helion’s team is hosting the Accelerate 2015- Hackathon happening on the 7-8th February 2015. […]

Hackers/coders wanted! Register for the Accelerate Hackathon hosted by HP Helion at DeveloperWeek 2015 originally published by Gigaom, © copyright 2015.

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Posted in Uncategorized.